SB

Naturalists in the dark – a story of the Amazonian forest during the night

Amphibians inventory in progress

Everybody heard about the Amazonian forest. Also called “Lung of the Earth”, it’s identified as the “biggest reservoir of biodiversity in the World”: Towering Trees and small multi-coloured creatures living on the ground with extravagant sounds. But at night, everything changes! Sounds become louder, trees look the same, everything seems different than during the day. At night a different forest emerges: nocturnal animals resume their activities and amphibians’ songs overshadow the sounds of birds’.

To become more knowledgeable about this ecosystem and the interactions between species of which it is composed, field work has to be done at night too. A naturalist’s job is to identify all species in an ecosystem. In the Aquicuana reserve, different naturalists are working: Hector is making plants inventories and amphibians inventory, which are planned during the night, will start soon. A previous study in the Aquicuana reserve revealed around 40 species during the dry season. But how many frogs, toads, gymnophionas and other amphibians can we see during the rainy season?

Will be continued!

This article was posted in Uncategorized, Volunteer Testimonials. Bookmark the permalink. Follow comments with the RSS feed for this post.Both comments and trackbacks are closed.

Find us on Facebook